Wordless Wednesday: Gifts for the Fay

Posted on Dec 17, 2014 in news & muse, the world around me, Wordless Wednesday

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Recently photographed in Ditmas Park, Brooklyn during one of my daily walks. I can’t help wonder whether the local squirrels have hidden some faery gifts inside this tree.

Publishing Monday: Author linkage inspiration and giveaway

Posted on Dec 15, 2014 in friends and colleagues, giveaways, interviews, news & muse, publications, publishing

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Here at Chez Art and Words apre le NaNoWriMo, I’m deep into design and holiday projects (see above). Like many in December, I’m on a push to finish everything up between now through the end of the year. Regardless, I can’t let the following friends’ and colleagues’ news go uncelebrated:

10855086_10205571501912788_776200096861261016_o1. Congrats to my friend Heather Webb whose new novel RODIN’S LOVER was featured in January’s Cosmopolitan magazine (right). They wrote, “You’ll be drawn into this story of obsession and passion between the artist and his apprentice/muse.” High praise indeed!

2. Author Robert Goolick (A RELIABLE WIFE) has just published a Christmas story entitled THE FINAL BALL OF ORIANNE DE PREMONVILLE. It can be found on Amazon under the Kindle Singles section, and involves the most beautiful red dress in the world. (I workshopped my opening chapters of A GATHERING OF SHADOWS with Goolrick at the Salt Cay Writers Retreat.)

3. There’s a massive giveaway of 22 books going on at the Historical Fiction Co-op. To enter the giveaway, click here. I’m a member of this wonderful group, along with C.W. Gortner, Lynn Cullen, Michelle Moran, and other notable authors.

EllenSeltzHeadshot-240x3004. Finally, on my author friend Christy English’s blog, I loved her thoughtful, funny interview with indie author Ellen Seltz (MR. MOTTLEY GETS HIS MAN). When I contacted Ellen about featuring the interview, she wrote regarding her decision to self-publish: “I think publishing is going the way of music and film—content with a broad appeal is going to benefit from that large distribution network, and niche content is better off in a focused channel.”

Other sage advice from Ellen:

Being an unpublished novelist may or may not correlate with being an inexperienced writer, or creative professional. If you have already developed your artistic sense and professional distance, great – go on and start learning the specifics of the form and the business side. If you don’t yet have a reliable sense of what professionalism is, or more importantly, how to tell whether you have written crap or not, then put publishing on hold till you get your crapometer calibrated. Put your stuff  in front of strangers (Strangers! Not your friends!) and see how they react. This is one of the benefits of the query/rejection/polish/resubmit process of legacy publishing, it forces you to see and relate to your work differently.

Read the rest of the interview here.

Wordless Wednesday: Japan in Brooklyn

Posted on Dec 10, 2014 in news & muse, the world around me, Wordless Wednesday

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The entry to the famed Japanese Garden of the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens. Photographed this autumn using the Hipstamatic tintype app.

Snippet Sunday: He drew closer

Posted on Dec 7, 2014 in news & muse, Snippet Sunday, the Next Novel

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Snippet Sunday is a monthly meme organized by Stephanie Dray in which historical authors post six sentence snippets of their novels. For the sake of organization, I’ve decided to post mine on the first Sunday of the month. You can read my previous snippets here.

December’s snippet is from the Next Novel, which is set in 1851 England. (This post offers more details.) This excerpt occurs at about the two-thirds point in my the novel. In it, my protagonist Robert encounters Isabelle, a mysterious woman whom he views as his antagonist.

He drew closer, careful not to make a sound as he limped in the rain-softened road.

 

Isabelle appeared to be staring out at the horizon at something he could not make out. Time slowed like treacle as Robert took in her arms raised toward the sky, her cape falling from them in some strange display of emotion his brain couldn’t fathom. She swayed in the sunshine, her eyes remaining shut as she tilted her head toward the sky. For the first time, her hair wasn’t tightly bound about her skull as it always was; she’d freed her plaits, allowing the tresses to flow down beyond her waist. As she swayed and turned about the moor, an army of sparrows fluttered from the tall grass surrounding her grey wool skirts.

Above photograph was taken in Gloucestershire, England outside Lechlade-on-Thames.

Creativity Friday: The Bureau of Memories

Posted on Dec 5, 2014 in creativity, events, friends and colleagues, news & muse, stuff I like, the world around me

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For today’s Creativity Friday post, I’m featuring the work of one of the most creative people I know: my husband, Thomas Ross Miller. Tom is an anthropologist, artist, musician, curator, professor, world traveler, and oh-so-much more. Besides all this, he’s a member of Ethnographic Terminalia, a curatorial collective that exhibits anthropological research in collaboration with contemporary art practices.

For their 2014 exhibit, Ethnographic Terminalia is presenting The Bureau of Memories: Archives & Ephemera, December 3-7 at Hierarchy gallery, 1847 Columbia Road NW, Washington, DC. This immersive installation, held jointly with the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association, features works by some two dozen artists and anthropologists. Re-imagining and remixing 20th-century media including 16-mm film, short-wave radio, land-line telephones, photogravure and paper documents, the exhibition invites visitors to encounter voices and images from the past in a 21st-century technological space.

More from the press release:

In a time of virtual reality, history haunts the present through the incomplete digital reanimation of traces from the past. Many analog collections built to preserve knowledge are becoming lost in the digital age. The Bureau of Memories considers archives as sites of both official records and broken fragments. The installation draws out anthropology’s uncanny specters, reinterpreting archives not only as repositories of information, but as generators of absence and obscurity. The international array of works on display includes prints, sculpture, textiles, video, and sonic artifacts from wax-cylinder field recordings to classic African radio broadcasts to a 3D-rendered audio spectrogram of the famous 18½-minute gap in the Watergate tapes.

So if you’re in the DC area, I hope you’ll stop by to experience The Bureau of Memories! The exhibit is open to the public. Gallery hours are 12-8 pm Wednesday-Friday, 10 am-6 pm Saturday, 12-6 pm Sunday. Admission is free.

Above image: Craig Campbell, Ethnographic Terminalia