Publishing Monday: 2015 Historical Novel Society conference

Posted on Jan 5, 2015 in events, news & muse, publishing, stuff I like, travels

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Already 2015 is shaping up to be a better year than 2014 on the author travel front. Besides my upcoming residency at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, I’m delighted to announce that I’ll be traveling to Denver for the Historical Novel Society Conference this June, where I’m on a panel entitled “The Art of Book Cover Design for Historical Fiction.”

My co-panelists are Sourcebooks editor Anna Michels, Emily Victorson of Allium Press, HNS’s own Sarah Johnson, and book cover designer Jenny Quinlan. I guess you could say I’m the author representative who just also happens to be a designer. I plan to expand upon my presentation on the semiotics of book cover design, which was a hit at 2013′s conference.

The Historical Novel Society Conference is one of my favorite author events of the year. I’ve attended every one since 2011 save for last year’s in London—alas, the timing didn’t work because of family obligations. So glad that 2015 will be different!

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Photos from HNS 2013: Me with my critique partner Teralyn Pilgrim dressed for the costume dinner—Teralyn’s pregnant vestal virgin brought down the house. Below, author friends Stephanie Lehmann (ASTOR PLACE VINTAGE), Mary Sharratt (ILLUMINATIONS), and Margaret George (who needs no introduction). Happy times!

Creativity Friday: The Bureau of Memories

Posted on Dec 5, 2014 in creativity, events, friends and colleagues, news & muse, stuff I like, the world around me

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For today’s Creativity Friday post, I’m featuring the work of one of the most creative people I know: my husband, Thomas Ross Miller. Tom is an anthropologist, artist, musician, curator, professor, world traveler, and oh-so-much more. Besides all this, he’s a member of Ethnographic Terminalia, a curatorial collective that exhibits anthropological research in collaboration with contemporary art practices.

For their 2014 exhibit, Ethnographic Terminalia is presenting The Bureau of Memories: Archives & Ephemera, December 3-7 at Hierarchy gallery, 1847 Columbia Road NW, Washington, DC. This immersive installation, held jointly with the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association, features works by some two dozen artists and anthropologists. Re-imagining and remixing 20th-century media including 16-mm film, short-wave radio, land-line telephones, photogravure and paper documents, the exhibition invites visitors to encounter voices and images from the past in a 21st-century technological space.

More from the press release:

In a time of virtual reality, history haunts the present through the incomplete digital reanimation of traces from the past. Many analog collections built to preserve knowledge are becoming lost in the digital age. The Bureau of Memories considers archives as sites of both official records and broken fragments. The installation draws out anthropology’s uncanny specters, reinterpreting archives not only as repositories of information, but as generators of absence and obscurity. The international array of works on display includes prints, sculpture, textiles, video, and sonic artifacts from wax-cylinder field recordings to classic African radio broadcasts to a 3D-rendered audio spectrogram of the famous 18½-minute gap in the Watergate tapes.

So if you’re in the DC area, I hope you’ll stop by to experience The Bureau of Memories! The exhibit is open to the public. Gallery hours are 12-8 pm Wednesday-Friday, 10 am-6 pm Saturday, 12-6 pm Sunday. Admission is free.

Above image: Craig Campbell, Ethnographic Terminalia

Publishing Monday: Litwrap reading reminder

Posted on Jul 28, 2014 in A Gathering of Shadows/The Lily Maid, events, friends and colleagues, news & muse, the Next Novel

“A painting undermined my father. And, as you will see by the end of my story, a painting nearly destroyed me. Art is dangerous like that, an unruly thing. I used to consider it as superfluous as those who dedicated their lives to creating it. I no longer do—I’ve learned this lesson, along with so many others, over the past months. During this period my life has become as foreign to me as another land….”

As I mentioned in Friday’s post, I’ll be reading tomorrow night at Litwrap’s Works-in-Progress summer reading. I’m planning to read from the first chapter of the Novel Formerly Known as THE LILY MAID (above) and a short excerpt from the Next Novel.

The details:

When: Tuesday, July 29th, 7 – 9PM

Where: Upstairs at 61 Local, 61 Bergen Street (corner of Smith Street), Brooklyn

The reading is supported in part by a grant from Poets & Writers. I’ll be joined by an awesome lineup of local writers: Brian Erickson, Ilana Kramer, Sarah Seltzer, Rachel Lyon, Max Bean, Mary Lannon, and Gerard Cabrera. If all this isn’t enough enticement, I’ll be spilling the new titles for THE LILY MAID and the Next Novel, which thus far only my literary agent and a few close friends know.

So, hope to see you there!

Publishing Monday: Awards, Grants, and Readings

Posted on Jul 7, 2014 in A Gathering of Shadows/The Lily Maid, events, news & muse, publishing, reviews + press, the Next Novel

Good news in Art and Words land:

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1. Poets & Writers has awarded LitWrap a grant for a Summer Works-in-Progress reading 

featuring moi. I’m planning to read excerpts from the Next Novel and the Novel Formerly Known as THE LILY MAID.

Here are the deets:

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When: Tuesday, July 29, 2014, 7 – 9 pm
Where: Upstairs at 61 Local
61 Bergen Street, Brooklyn, NY
Subway: F or G train to Bergen Street

Other authors will be participating. I’ll post their information as I learn more. Perhaps I’ll see you there?

2. At the 2014 INATS (International New Age Trade Show), The Sacred World Oracle (right) won the prestigious COVR award for Best Divination Deck of the Year. This is quite the honor, especially since my deck was up against some very stiff competition.

If that wasn’t exciting enough, there’s more: the Sacred World Oracle also won the top award for 2014 Product of the Year. Yup, the big kahuna.

I’m beyond thrilled.

ETA: The good people US Games Systems just sent me a photo of my deck flanked by its two awards. They look so substantial!

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Pregnant Vestal Virgins and Faux Absinthe: Historical Novel Society Conference recap, continued

Posted on Jul 2, 2013 in events, friends and colleagues, news & muse, publishing, the world around me, travels

Read part one of my Historical Novel Society Conference recap here

Despite averaging 4.5 hours of sleep over the past two nights, I was awake by 6:30 the following morning. After all, Saturday was the “big” day of HNS: panels, evening banquet, costume parade, and much more.

After breakfast, I attended Teralyn Pilgrim’s wonderful panel on depicting religion in historical fiction—I thought she did an amazing job moderating. I especially liked her observations on how a character’s religious beliefs can enrich a novel. Next up was the panel I moderated with Christy English, Mary Sharratt, Mitchell James Kaplan, and Michelle Cameron. It was entitled “Is ‘Genre’ a Dirty Word? Literary versus Commercial Historical Fiction.”

I did my best as moderator to encourage a lively back-and-forth with the audience. I think it worked: many expressed very strong opinions about what entails literary fiction (character- or description-driven, lush language, doesn’t sell well, boring, pretentious) versus commercial historical fiction (plot-driven, life without the boring parts, all-queens-all-the-time, salacious romances, even—gasp!—trashy). However, one of the points of our panel was to explore the many exceptions to these preconceptions: there are character-driven commercial novels just as much as there are plot-driven and salacious literary novels. The sub-genres of historical romances—Regency, Victorian steampunk, “bodice-rippers”—are ever-expanding in sales and influence; romance novels generated approximately three times as much money sales-wise as literary novels for publishing houses in 2012. Yet so-called “literary historicals”, such as Sarah Gruen’s WATER FOR ELEPHANTS and Hilary Mantel’s BRING UP THE BODIES, grace bestseller lists and best-of lists, churning millions of dollars into the industry. In other words, there’s room for all at the table.

The bottom line: what makes a historical novel literary or commercial often comes down to plain marketing, or how the publisher thinks the book will best sell. For example, the cover of Mitchell James Kaplan’s award-winning BY FIRE, BY WATER featured a beautiful painting of Isabella of Castille, despite the novel’s male protagonist. This was to make the book more appealing to female readers, who buy upward of  70% of fiction. Finally, I ended the panel with a visual presentation on the semiotics of historical book covers, which I’ll share here next week—everything from Philippa Gregory to Sarah Waters.*

I was so relieved our panel went well that the rest of the day seemed anticlimactic, though no less wonderful. I thoroughly enjoyed C. W. Gortner‘s keynote speech during lunch, which reminded authors to persevere and love what we do. In the afternoon, my hardest decision was which panel to attend. I often ended up compromising by sitting in on the first half of one, then the second half of another. I volunteered an hour critiquing manuscripts at the Blue Pencil Cafe before heading over to the book signing, where I scored autographed novels from Mary Sharratt, Erika Mailman, and Stephanie Lehmann. I also autographed a few DOOMED QUEENS myself.

And then it was finally time for the evening banquet and costume parade. Teralyn Pilgrim and I helped each other with our costumes—she had a tricky Vestal Virgin headdress, and I had tricky Victorian tea gown fastenings. Here we are, about to leave for the banquet.

And then we were off to the banquet! Here’s author Stephanie Lehmann (ASTOR PLACE VINTAGE) dressed in appropriately vintage clothing, Mary Sharratt, and author-queen Margaret George adorned for the Titanic.

The very glamorous Leslie Carroll (CONFESSIONS OF MARIE ANTOINETTE, ROYAL ROMANCES) in Versace. She served as one of the judges for the costume parade.

Stephanie Renee Dos Santos as Frida Kahlo, sporting cigarillo and attitude. (“What do my friends say about me?” Long pause. “Friends? I don’t have friends.”) She deservedly won for best depiction of a historical personage.

Finally, Teralyn brought down the house as a deep-in-denial pregnant Vestal Virgin. (“How dare you say I’m with child! I just have to lose some weight.”) She won for most historically accurate costume.

As for myself, I carried a goblet of faux absinthe—green food coloring mixed with water and milk—and swooned about in my best Pre-Raphaelite/Jane Morris manner in my hand-sewn Aesthetic Reform tea gown. Fun! (Photograph courtesy of Christopher Cevasco.)

The evening ended with a lively under-the-full-moon cocktail party at Deann Smith’s hotel suite, which featured an expansive outdoor terrace overlooking the sea and sky. As I chatted and celebrated with my fellow authors, I swore to myself I’d remember how happy I was at that moment, and that I’d return to the next Historical Novel Society conference come what may.

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I’m especially grateful to Julianne Douglas, Mary Tod, and Sarah Wendel for sharing their valuable thoughts and research for our panel.